fucktonofanatomyreferences:

Another splendid fuck-ton of clothing references (per request).

Someone scanned this from a book called “Drawing Yaoi.”

hey, mangosenpai, if you don't mind me asking, how do you have your lineart have so many colors? Is there a trick to coloring lines? :0
Anonymous ASKED

mangopops:

It’s easy! I draw my lineart freehand on sai, so my lineart layer is always transparent by default. Knowing that, I just use Opacity Lock to lock all the transparent pixels!

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Make sure the lineart layer has that little square checked-

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I tend to have the colors I want to use handy. Once the layer is locked, I start coloring the lines slowly and carefully-

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And I keep this up until everything I want colored is finished-

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And that’s it! I actually color my lines AFTER I finish my base colors/shading so I can see exactly what colors I can use to make them stand out. 

If you scan your lineart, however, it’s not transparent by default and unless you do some other things to make it transparent (I never scan lineart so I can’t tell you how to do this, sorry!), opacity lock won’t work the way you want it to-

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So, what you can do, if you’re lazy like me and don’t care to make the lineart transparent, is just make a new layer on TOP of your lineart and set it to screen like so-

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And just color your lines on that layer! Make sure when you’re ABSOLUTELY DONE to merge the coloring layer with the lineart layer so when you set the lineart layer to multiply (so you can actually apply your base colors), your base colors won’t look weird.

And there you have it! Hope that helps!

martyfun:

el-sato:

h-a-r-p-o:

Dan Fessler’s HD Index Painting Technique let’s you paint pixel art in Photoshop in a non-destructive manner, and lets you use pretty much every tool in a perfectly pixel-gradient fashion!

The article gives you everything you need to try it out for yourself.It’s easy to set up and use, and the results are so fucking cool.

pixel artists everywhere dying just so they can roll in their graves

wwwwwHHAAAT

pigeony:

sycophantism:

uber-chunks:

caitercates:

vanoty:

For Windows.

My friends and I occasionally have this problem so I’ve taught them this simple method that takes less than a minute as opposed to waiting several for your computer to restart(especially if it’s slow).

What’s great about this method is that sometimes restarting your computer wont fix the problem, but this usually will.

MAKE SURE YOU CLOSE ALL YOUR ART APPS.

This is important, otherwise the changes wont take effect. If it doesn’t work the first time, try again, sometimes it takes restarting it more than once.

For Windows 8, search for “services.msc” in your apps and click on the result. Continue from there!

Now go draw, babies!

THANK YOU DEAR LORD THANK YOU

GOD BLESS U TUMBLR USER  VANOTY 

Alternatively for Windows 7, click on your task bar and go to “Star Task Manager”, then tab over to Services and click on the “Services…” button at the bottom right.

or if you have a bamboo, hit the button to open the bamboo dock, close it, and instant success.

10 typical perspective errors

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

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Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

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For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

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it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

verceri:

A quick simple gear tutorial that I made on my own while working on some stuff. (Steampunk apparel for those FR adopts aha)

Works for the more complex gears as well! (Just add more lines to the sketch!)

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wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

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I just wanted to thank you for compiling all of these tutorials! <3
Anonymous ASKED

Hehehe you’re welcome!

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fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A coolio fuck-ton of female arm angle references.

Credit goes to melsrefs (on tumblr). You should flood Mel’s inbox with fanmail so s/he’ll make more of these epic references.