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wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

helpfulharrie:

!! Woah guys! Pixelovely’s new tools are finally out, one for hands & feet, and one for faces!

There’s now 429 photos of hands & feet, and 314 photos of faces. Dang!!

This is super cool news and I certainly can’t wait to start using them haha

I’ve got tons of tutorials on hands, feet and faces in their relevant tags, so be sure to check those out too nwn

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ziggyzagz:

I keep getting anon messages asking about how I draw faces, THIS IS NOT A GUIDE, but here is my process I guess? Obviously you need to keep SOME realistic guidelines in your style for it to look rational, but it’s also stylization, so you have freedom to mess with the proportions. When it comes to expressions, try not to be stiff and just play with how the faces contorts around what you’re trying to achieve..use a mirror if it helps! I’ve come to love the wrinkles above the eyebrows when you raise them.

ziggyzagz:

I keep getting anon messages asking about how I draw faces, THIS IS NOT A GUIDE, but here is my process I guess? Obviously you need to keep SOME realistic guidelines in your style for it to look rational, but it’s also stylization, so you have freedom to mess with the proportions. When it comes to expressions, try not to be stiff and just play with how the faces contorts around what you’re trying to achieve..use a mirror if it helps! I’ve come to love the wrinkles above the eyebrows when you raise them.

artutorials:

I am actually a sucker for a good expression tutorial. And this one is superb.Click through for the full tutorial. 

artutorials:

I am actually a sucker for a good expression tutorial. 

And this one is superb.

Click through for the full tutorial.